Top seven challenges Canadian immigrants face

Humanity’s interest in exploring and settling in new places is enduring and one of its primitive instincts. The impalpable desire to explore the boundaries of the world has benefited immigrants and nations for centuries. It is still in practice; however, many rules and regulations have been established to cross international borders. Canada is considered to be one of the best countries to immigrate, and its immigration-friendly policies seem to be the icing on the cake. Still, immigrating to a new country often comes with a myriad of challenges, some of which are discussed in this article.

Challenges faced by immigrants in Canada

Initial adjustment

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After landing in a new country, the first few weeks and sometimes even months go by in the primary but essential tasks like getting a rental apartment, applying for social insurance, health care, driver’s license, etc.

Mobility

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Various countries have different driving rules and regulations, and getting accustomed to that takes time. Even you consider yourself a good driver, getting a driver’s license is a gradual process, and the cost of car insurance is often a deterrent for newcomers.

Employment

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The jobs for newcomers are not always high paying. It can be challenging to find employment status matching your home country, especially for mid and senior-level employees. One should be prepared to invest one to two months to secure their dream job.

Education

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Degrees can be country-specific, which means that some degrees are not considered equivalent in other countries, resulting the immigrants to retake the courses or change their professional fields altogether.

Language

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Though getting high band scores in English language tests like IELTS or CELPIP is mandatory for most permanent residency programs, getting used to the everyday expressions and dialects can be hard at first.

Climate

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You may have heard of cultural shock, but climate shock is a real thing for many, including me. The difference in the weather is extreme, especially if you are migrating from a tropical region. Remember, Canadians are warm; Canada is not.

How to be prepared

Research

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Take enough time to weigh the goals and objectives of your reasons to move. Also, researching additional courses or exams you need to take to gain Canadian equivalency is also helpful.

Settlement agencies

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Many regional and national level agencies provide direct and indirect assistance to immigrants. They can even help you in gaining your first employment. 

Perseverance

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Remember, Rome was not built in a day. Patience and perseverance are essential to fuel your commitment to contributing to the society while focusing on a better life and career.

Multicultural organizations

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These agencies provide a platform to newcomers to connect with like-minded people and also mentors, while you learn how about different cultures and traditions.

Explore

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Learn and explore the places of cultural and historical significance.

Volunteer

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Volunteering not only helps you give a greater purpose in your life, but it also helps you gain Canadian experience and create new connections along the way.

Seek help

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Whether you are struggling emotionally, mentally, or financially, it is crucial to seek help. Canadian government has various programs in place, both for your financial and mental health needs.

Canada is one of the most immigration-friendly countries. Being aware of and ready for the possible bottlenecks the newcomers face is the key to survive and thrive in the first few months.

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